Bonaparte, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn

Bonaparte, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn
Bonaparte, Trumpet & Horn

Carlton, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn

Carlton, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn
Carlton, Trumpet & Horn

Dashwood, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn

Dashwood, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn
Dashwood, Trumpet & Horn

Loveland, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn

Loveland, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn
Loveland, Trumpet & Horn

Montmartre, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn

Montmartre, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn
Montmartre, Trumpet & Horn

Piccadilly, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn

Piccadilly, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn
Piccadilly, Trumpet & Horn

Swan Lake, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn

Swan Lake, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn
Swan Lake, Trumpet & Horn

Vienna, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn

Vienna, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn
Vienna, Trumpet & Horn

Yellow Peachtree, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn

Yellow Peachtree, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn
Yellow Peachtree, Trumpet & Horn

Stony Point, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn

Stony Point, Edwardian Vintage Engagement Ring, Trumpet & Horn
Stony Point, Trumpet & Horn

If you’re the type to scour thrift stores and high-end vintage retailers, you’ll have noticed the decorative and intricate designs of the Edwardian Era.

But just what embodies an Edwardian-era ring? We asked the experts at Trumpet & Horn to weigh in with a bit of a history lesson so that when someone asks about your gorgeous vintage ring, you’ve got all the answers.

The Edwardian era overlapped the Art Nouveau period, beginning in 1901 when Queen Victoria’s son Edward took the throne of England, and ending in 1914 with the beginning of World War I.

During this time, advances in metal fabrication allowed platinum to be used in jewellery making. As a result, designs became more detailed and intricate than previous eras. A type of decorative enhancement, known as “milgraining” also came into popular use amongst jewelers in the early 1900’s. Milgrain decoration adds a beaded string along the edges of the jewel setting, giving the ring a softer, more elegant look through texture.

At the start of World War 1 in 1914, platinum became temporarily scarce and its use in jewellery production came to a halt.

The intricate designs you’ll note most of the era include complicated-looking settings in a huge array of shapes and sizes. They use both coloured gemstones, pearls and diamonds, encircled by smaller gems. Some vintage rings from the Edwardian period are so detailed that it appears the diamonds or colored gemstones are set in lace instead of metal. In fact, platinum bands often feature leaves or flowers for a romantic (and invisible) setting. Designs that play most with the platinum band and milgrain detail appear light and airy, for a feminine aesthetic.